Radiocarbon dating dinosaurs

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* Carbon 14 in Dinosaurs at Singapore's American Geophysical Conference: On how to date a dinosaur, Real Science Radio's Bob Enyart interviews Hugh Miller, a member of the international scientific team that presented at the 2012 AGU geophysical conference in Singapore, the carbon dating results from five respected laboratories around the world of bones from ten dinosaurs (from the Gobi Desert in China, from Europe, Alaska, Texas, and Montana). Yet each of these dinosaurs had plenty of radiocarbon (as expected in that virtually every relevant peer-reviewed paper on the topic confirms the presence of endogenous soft tissue in fossils; see Dinosaur Soft Tissue.com).

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(See below, 42 minutes into Paul Giem's 2013 presentation.) If the contamination occurred 12,000 years ago, 10% of the bone would have to be replaced; 18,000 years ago, 20%; if it occurred 24,000 years ago, 40% of the bone would have had to be replaced, and if (in the evolutionary perspective) a mere 30,000 years ago, 80% of the bone would have to be replace by a contamination process.

And consider this from a peer-reviewed paper in a respected scientific journal, "at a constant 10°C (the approximate mean annual air temperature in Britain today) it will take between 0.2 and 0.7 Ma for levels of collagen to fall to 1% of their original concentration in an optimal burial environment." * Getting Graded: An expert on radiocarbon dating, long-time assistant professor at Loma Linda University, Dr. The teacher corrected a couple points and clarified a few others.The assumption by evolutionary geophysicists proposes that the 14c in diamonds, coal, etc., must have come from neutron capture by carbon-13 or nitrogen-14.Theoretical physicist Lawrence Krauss told RSR's Bob Enyart (rsr.org/krauss) that 14c in allegedly million-year-old specimens is an "anomaly." However, an anomaly is something that deviates from what is standard, normal, or expected.As reported in 2011 in the journal PLo S One, in an allegedly 80-million year old mosasaur.As reported in the journal Radiocarbon in natural gas, coal, oil and other petroleum products.

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